Thursday, December 4, 2014

Remembering TDOR 2014 Charleston SC

Remembering TDOR 2014

By Sabrina Samone, TMP

This past month sisters, brothers, and allies came together around the world to remember those that will not be joining us to ring in a new year...and another year of life. Cities and towns across the nation and the globe held memorials to the list of names fallen due to gruesome deaths.

Names like:
Curtis Lipscomb, found shot and burned beyond recognition in a trash can in Detroit Mi.
Tiffany Edwards, gunned down in the middle of the street in Cincinnati OH.
Prince Joe, stabbed to death in Belize after being held up at knife point and giving the attackers everything they wanted. The list as we heard Nov. 20 went on and on.


The Reverend Arrington of UFcc Charleston
For me this year was more memorable as I got the chance to be part of Charleston, SC's first Transgender Day of  Remembrance ceremonies. Being at a TDOR event live is a world's difference from reading of one or seeing a video. As the names were read by countless allies and members of our community, tears swelled and all I could think about was what was I doing that day when Mia Henderson was found brutally murdered in a Baltimore Maryland alley.

TDOR was founded in 1998 by Gwendolyn Ann Smith, a trans-female graphic designer, columnist, and activist, to memorialize the murder of Rita Hester in Alston, Mass. Since its inception, TDOR has been held annually on November 20 and has slowly evolved from the web-based project started by Smith into an international day of action. TDOR is now observed in over 185 cities throughout more than 20 countries.

Dayna Smith Poet
Special thanks to the sponsors of the Charleston, SC TDOR, SC Trans Action and We Are Family. A huge applause to our host for the evening, Amy Garboti, SC Equality Trans Action, and huge hug to my sister Amy for the invite to speak. I had a blast and enjoyed the comradery of the event.


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